mdz1971:

JESUS TAKE THE WHEEL

mdz1971:

JESUS TAKE THE WHEEL


The Nymph of Amalthea, 1780s

The Nymph of Amalthea, 1780s

(via antediluviancurrent)

Use of the @ Symbol

lati-negros:

With the virtual uses and changing of language online it’s important we note how we are using the @ symbol in our name and in the things we are creating and writing. For many of you this is “common knowledge,” but the reality is that some folks have not ever really thought about why this symbol is important.

We think the @ symbol is important because it represents gender neutrality, gender inclusion, and disrupts the misogynistic ways language privileges men, masculinity, and things that are considered “male.”As many Latin@ scholars have stated and argued, especially Anzaldua, “Language is a male discourse” (p. 54, Borderlands/La Frontera). In the Spanish language, grammatically, if there is one man present in a room or area filled with women (a man of any age, a boy, a child, etc.) instead of using the “feminine” form of the language often using an “a” (i.e. una or nosotras) a masculine “o” is used (i.e. nosotros or the absence of the “a” such as un).

Utilizing the @ in this way challenges these grammatical “rules” that are embedded in a legacy of privileging men, masculinity and maleness. It is also part of a legacy that includes and recognizes our gender queer and trans* community members versus erasing them by constantly using a language embedded in a gender binary/dichotomy.

The @ is useful not only in discussing Latinidad, but also discussing how Blackness and African identity intersects as well. Often when we see terms discussing LatiNegr@s in various ways and using other self-identifiers they are still using a masculine version of “Afro” such as “Afro-Latin@”. This is a preference by some, and I’d like to argue this is also a way of privileging men and masculinity in the English language. Afr@Latin@ is a valid term and form to use when discussing our identities as well. Just as AfraLatina is valid. Why must the African in us also remain masculine?

The questions still exist of how to actually speak the @ sign and this has yet to really be resolved. How have others negotiated this?

(written by Bianca)

Now I know.

(via sinidentidades)

wmzink:

Forgot one of my favorite songs in my LA punk Americana outburst yesterday: The Plugz’s “Better Luck”

Tito Larriva is a Robert Rodriguez crony, has appeared in Desperado and Once Upon a Time in Mexico, etc.

Anyway, this song is up there with almost anything X did in my book.

Favorite Plugz song.

Album Art

insertpsychonamehere:

El Clavo Y La Cruz- The Plugz (1981)

Since people seeing that Dylan post may not be familiar with The Plugz, here ya go.

ArtistThe Plugz
TitleEl Clavo Y La Cruz
AlbumBetter Luck
The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything. — Scott Wood (X)

(via sinidentidades)

mdz1971:

Bob Dylan doing “Jokerman” on David Letterman, 1984.  This shreds hard. The original is great; but I think I like this one even better, crappy harp solo and all.

I wanted to reblog this again because I was at work last time and didn’t get to add commentary (yeah, yeah, I know).

I have said here before that I am not a Dylan fan, but that I have tried over the years to “get” him, yet failed. There is a reason I keep coming back, though, and this clip illustrates it.

First, there is his willingness to always examine his own work, and how it relates to a given moment.  This is so much more than the “re-invention” that many pop stars are lauded for going through, which essentially is nothing more than re-branding.  Dylan seems to evaluate and reinterpret his work constantly, such as here: “Jokerman” was the opening track on Infidels, which was released only a few short months before this set.  He was theoretically touring to promote the album; and yet, already, the material was getting radically transformed.  On the album, “Jokerman” was a MOR snooze-fest produced by Mark Knopfler, with a by then cliche reggae beat (at least they hired Sly and Robbie for the rhythm section … paying white boys to rip off Jamaica would have been adding insult to injury), which was only lifted to notable status by Dylan’s sneering vocals.  Here, Dylan gets a punk backing band, shifts the song into 2/4, and makes the whole song sneer.  It is, for most of this performance, the best possible version of the song.

It also showcases another thing I have always liked about Dylan: not only does he not treat performances as sacred (by trying to reproduce the studio recording, or at least “staying faithful” to the original in some “spiritual” sense), he doesn’t even treat the songs as sacred.  Here, as he does so often, the distinctive melodies of his song are torn apart, disembodied, and dropped back into the songs as signifiers more than actual melodies.

And let’s talk about the band, shall we?  Dylan is famous for his various collaborations, but this is one you never hear about: his backing band on this is legendary Mexican/American punk rock band The Plugz (minus founder/lead singer/Robert Rodriguez cohort Tito Lariva).  The point is not that it was a gutsy choice - though taking an unknown Latino punk rock band onto the Late Show in 1984 probably qualifies as gutsy - the point is that it was a brilliant musical choice.  

And finally, there’s the harmonica solo.  How can you not love someone who gives so few fucks? 

(via wmzink)

transwomanilluminati:


Here’s Thompson’s first story about a friend:
My schoolfriend Michael – an atheist for decades – rang me the other night and told me he’d returned to the Catholic Church. “And you’ll never guess who converted me,” he said.
“Your wife?”
“No! It was Richard Dawkins!”
He explained that he was, and is, a huge admirer of Dawkins the biologist. (I’m with him there: I read The Blind Watchmaker when it first came out and was blown away.) “But then I read The God Delusion and it was… total crap. So bad that I started questioning my own atheism. Then he started tweeting.”
Like a loony on top of the bus, no?
“Exactly!”

richard dawkins’ twitter converted someone to catholicism

If you find yourself agreeing with an idiot, it’s time to check yourself. Just to make sure you’re not an idiot too.

transwomanilluminati:

Here’s Thompson’s first story about a friend:

My schoolfriend Michael – an atheist for decades – rang me the other night and told me he’d returned to the Catholic Church. “And you’ll never guess who converted me,” he said.

“Your wife?”

“No! It was Richard Dawkins!”

He explained that he was, and is, a huge admirer of Dawkins the biologist. (I’m with him there: I read The Blind Watchmaker when it first came out and was blown away.) “But then I read The God Delusion and it was… total crap. So bad that I started questioning my own atheism. Then he started tweeting.”

Like a loony on top of the bus, no?

“Exactly!”

richard dawkins’ twitter converted someone to catholicism

If you find yourself agreeing with an idiot, it’s time to check yourself. Just to make sure you’re not an idiot too.

(via layfloordoomall)

While y’all were staying BOSTONSTRONG, a torch was quietly passed.

Adam Dunn passed Dave Kingman on the career home run list.

Way to go, Bubba.